Curriculum

Information Security Law

B587 is taught by F. Cate

Our economy increasingly depends on data and on an increasingly ubiquitous cyber infrastructure that not only to collects and transmits these data, but also controls critical systems including financial payment networks, transportation infrastructure, utilities (e.g., smart grid), just-in-time supply and manufacturing chains, and command and control structures in military and civilian operations. Information security is a rapidly growing area of law that responds to the need to secure these data and this cyber infrastructure from hacking and other forms of unauthorized access, viruses, denial of service attacks, terrorist attacks, theft, misuse, and accidental destruction or alteration. This course will examine these topics and the legal and policy issues they raise for a wide range of corporations, not for profit organizations, civilian government agencies, and individuals. We will look at vulnerabilities of data and cyber infrastructure; statutes and cases addressing Fourth Amendment and related issues; industry-specific laws and regulations affecting information security; and new initiatives from federal and state governments. No technical knowledge is required.

(Professor Fidler offers a course on cybersecurity law and policy in the spring semester that focuses on national security challenges governments face when addressing crime, terrorism, espionage, and war in cyberspace.)