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The Indiana Law Library Blog

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Legacies Captured in Art

When you think of art, one of the last places that probably comes to mind is the law library. Yet, it is replete with artistic touches – an old panoramic print of the graduating class of 1913 in Dunn’s Woods hangs over the copy machines, an oil painting beautifies the Rare Book room, and, a more modern addition, the digital sign, strikes a balance between utility and aesthetics at the library’s entryway. The artwork in the law library falls into three main categories: works that are historically or institutionally significant, those that are topically relevant, and others which are simply artistic. Furthermore, much of the art on display straddles more than one of these distinctions. Read on to learn a little bit more about the wonderful art which surrounds you…

Platonic Geometry: the Morton Bradley, Jr. sculptures

One of the most striking art features in the law library are Morton C. Bradley’s Jr.’s sculptures. Showcased and individually suspended from the ceiling of the reading room, they serenely float in the five-story atrium far above the patrons below. Morton Bradley’s connection to Indiana University spans several generations. He was a relative of the University’s first president, Andrew Wylie, and Bradley’s grandmother (Elizabeth Louisa Wylie) grew up in the historic Wylie House. In addition, Bradley’s father – Morton C. Bradley Sr. – was a proud graduate of Indiana University. Upon his passing in 2004, Bradley gifted his entire body of artwork to Indiana University, which included over 300 distinct pieces of art.

The law library houses nine of Bradley’s geometric sculptures. Rooted in the principles of Platonic geometry, Bradley was fascinated with the five Platonic solids: tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, dodecahedron, and icosahedron. His sculptures vary these basic solid forms by manipulating their faces, edges, and angles to create entirely new structures. The nine sculptures hung in the law library are: Untitled, Constellation series (1971); Interlace (1975); Recessions (1976); Sixty Circles (1976); The Great Machiavellian Knot, from the Knot series (1983); Staccato (1986); Kahlil Gibran: A Portrait, from the Pattern series (1987); and from the Polylink series, both Festival (1988) and Chrysalis (1989).

Size varies from piece to piece, but most of the law library’s Bradley sculptures are several feet in diameter, with the largest having a diameter of over five feet. The materials used to create these pieces include aluminum, steel, brass, Lexan (a plastic composite used in impact-resistant objects) and wood. Each is finished with paint in an array of soft colors designed to highlight the shadows and angles of the multidimensional designs. Full Story »

The Law Library: Constant, Yet Always Changing

The traditional image of the library typically involves an institution that is unchanging as the world around it changes. Some view this as dependability, others view it as obsolescence. In truth, there are many aspects of the library that have been around for decades or even centuries – we still collect books; our main services are still in cataloging, reference, and circulation; and our primary goal is still to help people find the information they seek – but just because our core function is the same does not mean we’re not changing with the times. In honor of National Library Week, I thought I’d highlight some of the recent ways the Law Library continues to update our existing services to meet your changing needs.

When most people think about Technical Services they think mostly of the creation and maintenance of the library’s catalog, but that’s only a fraction of what they do. Our Technical Services team also maintains the law school archives, and recently began a digital repository, bringing together faculty publications, a comprehensive digital collection of our law journals, and historical law school documents, all in one place and freely accessible. In just over three years, we have already had 1.7 million downloads!

Public Services – comprising both Circulation and Reference – has seen many recent additions and updates as well. Last summer, Circulation moved to an online scheduling system for conference room reservations, allowing you to schedule your reservations remotely. To better serve our patrons, Circulation also added a scan-on-demand service to facilitate quick, digital access to our print collection (within the limitations of copyright law, of course!). You can learn more about the many services offered in Circulation by checking out our Circulation Guide.

Over in Reference we have seen many recent changes to better serve your needs. Earlier this year we adopted LibChat to offer another way to ask us reference questions, supplementing in-person, over-the-phone, and Ask-a-Librarian interactions. We continue to add to and update our vast collection of online Research Guides covering an array of legal topics. We began an Advanced Legal Research course for those interested in honing this particular lawyering skill. And in January, we hired Kim Mattioli as our first Student Services Librarian, to be a resource entirely devoted to the research needs of our students and student groups.

Finally, and more generally speaking, the Law Library has in recent years updated our communication methods to include social media and a digital sign. Yes, our core services remain unchanged, but the means of executing those services are ever-evolving.

Now, as we don our new name, the Jerome Hall Law Library thanks you for another great year!

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Services for Alumni

hein-alumni-accessYou graduated.  Congratulations!  Here’s our gift to you: The Law Library is here to help you even post-graduation.  Our newest service for alumni is a subscription to HeinOnline’s Alumni Access Program, which provides you access to Hein’s Law Journal Library.  This collection is well known for providing access to the full run of a vast collection of law reviews, bar journals, and more, and the Alumni Access Program ensures that you retain access to this significant collection even as you venture beyond your law school years.  Sign up for access to our Hein Alumni account by visiting our Alumni Services guide and filling out the brief form.

While at this guide, you might want to take a look at some of the other services available to you as an alum.  For instance, if you have an interest in multidisciplinary databases, you may want to look into IU’s alumni access to JSTOR and ProjectMuse.  If you are interested in using materials from our physical collection, refer to this guide to see what copy and send services we offer.

Most importantly, don’t forget that the reference librarians are here to help you, no matter where you’re located or how long ago you graduated.  We’ve created and continue to build a collection of research guides on a variety of legal research subjects.  Materials in our digital repository – including historical school documents as well as a considerable library of scholarly articles from our journals and our faculty – are available to you for free.  Finally, we’d be happy to answer your research questions over the phone (812) 855-2938, via email, or in person.

You may leave, but we’re still here for you!  Remember, when in doubt, ask a law librarian.

Law Library Evening Workshops: Researching Statutes in Print

Starting tonight, the Law Library’s Evening Workshop Series continues.  Our sessions this week (October 21st – 24th) will be dedicated to: Researching Statutes in Print.

Don’t let your upcoming LRW assignment *spook* you!  This workshop is exclusively for 1Ls and will cover the location of law library’s state codes, statutory search strategies, and will be chock full o’ tips, not tricks.

There are four sessions available:

When:              7:30 pm – 8:00 pm, October 21st-24th.  *Each will cover the same material.*

Where:            Law Library’s lobby (in front of the Circulation Desk)

Who:               1Ls

If you have questions about this workshop, please contact the Reference Office for more information.  You can call us at (812) 855-2938 or — better yet — stop by and ask us about it.  We hope to see you this week!

“In One Hour”: Check out these technology books with a legal spin

You’ve used our collection to help you prepare for class or research a paper, but did you that we have several books in our collection on technology too?

Google Gmail and Calendar in One Hour for Lawyers – KF 320 .A9 L48 2013

iPad Apps in One Hour for Lawyers – KF 320 .A9 M45 2012

iPad in One Hour for Lawyers – KF 320 .A9 M48 2012

iPad in One Hour for Litigators – KF 320 .A9 M485 2013

Android Apps in One Hour for Lawyers – KF 320 .A9 S55 2013

Twitter in One Hour for Lawyers – KF 320 .I57 C67 2012

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers – KF 320 .I57 K46 2012

Blogging in One Hour for Lawyers – KF 320 .I57 S88 2012

I know, looking at some of these titles, you might be thinking that you already know how these technologies work, so these books aren’t for you.  However, even for a technology you’ve been using for years, these books offer a great new perspective for you – how (and, equally importantly, how not) to use these technologies as an attorney.  These books cover not only the features of the technology, but also ethical rules regarding the use of these types of technologies by attorneys, real-life examples and cautionary tales, and more.

As you prepare for job interviews, whether for summer clerkships or post-graduation, you will be faced with technologies, some of which will be familiar, and others that will not.  In some ways, the familiar technologies can pose more of a risk, because you will need to find new ways to approach them to avoid ethical mishaps.  Being aware of these technologies and how attorneys are using them could very well benefit you in an interview or as you start your new job.

And if you’re still not convinced that these books are worth your time, you could always consult the ABA’s 2012 Legal Technology Survey Report to see what technologies attorneys, from solo practitioners to Big Law, utilize on a regular basis  (KF 320 .A9 L43 2012.)  From advertising to client communication to competitive intelligence, these social networks and newer technologies come into play in law practice more often than you’d think.

And although I know class work keeps you busy enough without having to crack another book, don’t worry – these books fairly live up to their name – they can generally be digested in around an hour.  You can find them on the third floor of the library.  Happy reading.

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New Around the Library: Mobile Device Charging Station

It’s hard to believe summer is almost over! As you get ready to return to school, we wanted to let you know about a project the Law Library has been working on this summer. We have just installed a charging station in the library lobby, capable of charging a variety of mobile devices, across multiple operating systems. You will find this charging station mounted on the column next to the seating area as you enter the library.

chargingstation

We hope you will find this device helpful and convenient, but please remember to be responsible when charging your mobile device – do not leave it unattended. When you’re batteries are drained, let the library provide the charge you need to get through the day!

Cyber(law) Monday — it won’t cost you a cent!

You’ve already selected the obligatory new tie for Dad; used the discount code UGLYXMASSWEATER to buy Mom a festive holiday cardigan; and snagged the video game at the top of your sister’s wish list.  Now what should you do with the rest of your Cyber Monday?  Why not consider engaging in a bit of computer law research?

According to the Council on Research Excellence,  Americans spent an average of over 2 hours per day (142.8 minutes) parked in front of their computers as of 2009.  Technological advances and the increased importance of computing and the Internet in American society have created a burgeoning new legal field.  Per Black’s Law Dictionary, cyberlaw deals “…with the Internet, encompassing cases, statutes, regulations, and disputes that affect people and businesses interacting through computers.  [It] addresses issues of online speech and business that arise because of the nature of the medium, including intellectual property rights, free speech, privacy, e-commerce, and safety, as well as questions of jurisdiction.”

There are a number of online legal publications devoted to technology and intellectual property issues.  Among them, the Maurer School of Law’s IP Theory, which is available in our digital repository.  Other major law journal publications covering this topic include the Berkeley Technology Law Journal, Harvard’s Journal of Law & Technology, and Florida’s Journal of Technology Law & Policy.  In HeinOnline, you can search the Law Journal Library for topical articles in additional journals.  While you are there, be sure to search their new Intellectual Property Law Collection too.

Several of the law library’s electronic databases also contain cyberlaw material.  Bloomberg’s Technology and Internet Law practice page has a sizable amount of information, with an emphasis on current developments and news.  Lexis Advance’s Computer & Internet Law database can be selected (and searched) using the “Browse Topics” tab and contains a helpful breakdown of the major subtopics.

Another great place to conduct Internet law research is IUCAT.  Because cyberlaw is a loosely-defined area of law that is closely intertwined with several broad legal concepts, search term selection is particularly critical, whether you are searching the Internet or a library catalog.  Try using “cyberlaw” and its synonyms, such as “Internet law” or “virtual law” or “computer law”.  Additionally, it is a good practice to attempt searches combining the core subject term (i.e., “the Internet”) and any narrower terms applicable to your research interests (i.e., “privacy” or “intellectual property”).  The law library has several recent print publications on computer and technology law.  Books on this subject are classified beginning at KF390.5 and located on the 3rd floor.  Thumb through the volumes of  Law of the Internet (3rd edition), peruse Virtual Law, or scan Internet Law in a Nutshell (on reserve at the circulation desk).

For current awareness resources, look at the ABA Journal’s list of technology law-focused blogs and news sites, Science and Technology Law Blawgs, and any of the numerous institutes on technology and law: Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, Center for Innovation Law & Policy, and Stanford’s Center for Internet & Society, to name a few.  These organizations often host conferences and publish articles on Internet law and related topics.  GL&HF researching cyberlaw!

Congratulations Linda Fariss!

The Law Library is delighted to welcome Linda Fariss as its new Director.  Linda has been the Associate Director of the Law Library for many years, so she knows and is dedicated to the continuing excellence of the Library—there simply isn’t a better choice for the position.  In addition, Keith Buckley and Nonie Watt have been named Assistant Directors of the Law Library, Keith for Public Services and Nonie for Technical Services.  So congratulations, Linda, Keith, and Nonie!  The Law Library is lucky to have you!

HeinOnline Adds Official Canada Supreme Court Reports

HeinOnline recently added the official Canada Supreme Court Reports to its basic subscription, beginning with volume one (1876). While the entire collection is of potential interest, volumes published since 1982 are of particular interest to constitutional law comparativists. In that year Canada “patriated” its constitution, formerly the British North America Act, 1867, and added to it the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which is analogous to the U.S. Bill of Rights. The new constitution conferred on the Canadian Supreme Court the power to interpret the provisions of the Charter, leading to the advent of constitutional judicial review, previously unknown in the British Commonwealth.  The Canadian Supreme Court’s subsequent jurisprudence is of great interest to American comparativists because it addresses many of the same issues that have come before the U.S. Supreme Court during the same period. Full Story »

Law Library Carrels Go “Green”

The Law Library has 300 carrels that all have lights built into them.  For several years we have been struggling to keep the lights in working condition, not to mention the constant need to replace the light bulbs. Thanks to funding from the University, the carrels now all have new LED lights! These lights use far less energy and provide almost twice the light of the old fixtures.  Not only are they more efficient, but they will be maintenance free for many years to come.

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