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The Indiana Law Library Blog

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Happy Bill of Rights Day!

On December 15th, 1791 the Bill of Rights was ratified and came into effect. It’s tough to imagine our country without it. There are various ways to celebrate Bill of Rights Day, including by reading the Bill of Rights, and you can sign a pledge to that effect. Or you could read more about the creation of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Or you could take one of the many Bill of Rights quizzes online like this one, or for a slightly harder one devoted entirely to the first amendment, try here.  In any case, it doesn’t hurt to take a break from studying for you finals to appreciate the significance of the laws you are studying.  Happy Bill of Rights Day!

Library Summer Diversions

So, you’re in Bloomington for the summer. Doing an externship for credit, maybe a B706, waiting to begin as a summer starter, or worst of all, about to begin a bar review course. Kind of makes you wonder why you wanted to be a lawyer, right? Full Story »

Law Firm Taglines

What makes a good tagline?  This question is considered on Ross’s Law Marketing Blog this week.  Ross says that you want something unique—that will let your customers know what they are getting at the same time as it lets employees know what is important to the firm.  He then lists a few less than stellar taglines followed by 20 of the best.  What do you like or dislike about these taglines?  If you could pick your own firm tagline what would it be?

A Town Hall on Facebook

President Obama will be holding a town hall today—on Facebook.  At 4:45 Eastern Time there will be a streaming town hall.  All you have to do is like the White House Facebook page and then RSVP for the event.  You can submit questions, either via Facebook, or from www.whitehouse.gov/facebooktownhall.  President Obama has been active in using social media in the past, and for this event he will be broadcasting live form Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto.  More than 35,000 people have already RSVP’d.

The Value Of The White House

According to popular real estate website Zillow.com the White House is not immune from the recent housing crisis.  The famous house at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue has dropped in value from $331.5 million dollars in 2007 to a mere $251.5 million at the moment.  It seems to have dropped about $5 million in value just in the past month.  It is entertaining to look at the Zillow listing—it is not often that you see single family residences of 55,000 square feet built in 1792 with forced air heating.  For more information, take a look at articles from Yahoo and the L.A. Times.

The Music of Law

Loren Wells, a law graduate from Washington University in St. Louis School of Law, decided to combine his interest in law with his love of music, creating www.thediscography.org.  It is a collection of 2,400 court opinions that deal with the music industry in some way.  Are you a lover of music as well as a legal eagle?  If so check it out—and also the write-up about it in the National Law Journal.

Supreme Eggnog

‘Tis the season for eggnog! Ever wonder what the legal description of eggnog is?   Well look no further than 12 CFR 131.170.  For a more simple legally related eggnog, take a look at our post from last year at about this time.  We reprinted an eggnog recipe from former Chief Justice Harlan Stone sent to us from the Green Bag.  In case you have forgotten, here it is again, complete with color text.  Enjoy!

Harlan Fiske Stone and his wife Agnes Harvey Stone hosted a New Year’s Eve reception every year (save one) that he served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The Chief Justice was a respectable oenophile, but he had no objections to egg nog in its season, and the Stones habitually attended several egg nog parties hosted by various government officials on December 31.

Preserved for posterity in the papers he deposited in the Library of Congress is what appears to be the Stone’s own egg nog recipe. It is reprinted – without warranty – below. Harry Parker we have been unable to identify. One unconfirmed suggestion is that Parker may have been a messenger for Justice Felix Frankfurter. In any event, Chief Justice Stone was a great lover of good food and drink, as well as of the law. We are sure he would be pleased that his legacy includes the former as well as the latter.

Egg Nog – Harry Parker (by way of Chief Justice Harlan Fiske Stone)

Ingredients:

12 eggs

1 gallon milk

Ground nutmeg

1 lb sugar

1 quart whiskey

½ pint brandy

1/8 pint rum

1) Separate egg yolks from whites

2) Cream yolks of eggs and sugar together

3) Add whiskey, brandy and rum. Beat well

4) Add milk, stir well

5) Add nutmeg to taste

6) Beat whites of eggs very light

7) Add the beaten whites of eggs and stir in well

Notes: If put in cold place will keep for 30 days. Never use all cream. Cream contains large percentage of fat. If made of all cream the egg nog will become rancid. Be sure to add whiskey, brandy and rum before adding milk.

Holiday Cards from Law Firms

The Wall Street Journal Law Blog has just declared its favorite 2010 holiday card received from a law firm—that of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips.  And it is cute!  Above the Law in short order declared its second annual firm holiday card contest, posting last year’s winner from Akin Gump, and two nice ones they got this year from Much Shelist and Gordon & Rees. Have you seen any particularly clever holiday e-cards?  If so, send them on to ATL!

Vote For Your Favorite Legal Blog!

The ABA Journal has just started voting for its 4th Annual Blawg 100.  Editors pick their top 100 law related blogs, and then you can weigh in with your own votes as to which are the best of the best. You do need to register to vote, as there were voting irregularities before they required registration, but once in you can choose your favorites in 12 different categories.  Have a favorite blawg?  Then voting for it is a good way to support it!

John Paul Stevens Speaks Out

Having recently retired from the Supreme Court, Justice John Paul Stevens is speaking his mind about issues he dealt with on the court.  In a forthcoming book review for the New York Review of Books he discusses the death penalty, and why, more than 30 years after he voted to reinstate the death penalty in 1976, he no longer feels that it is appropriate.  The New York Times covers the story, and also suggests that this may be a new trend for retired justices, who tend to stay away from controversial issues in their retirement. On Sunday Stevens appeared on 60 Minutes, talking not only about the death penalty, but also the Bush v. Gore case, the rights of Guantanamo Bay detainees—and about being at the famous 1932 World Series ball game in which Babe Ruth called his shot.

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