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Indiana Law Annotated

Vol. 24 No. 10 (March 31, 2003)

Table of Contents

HARRIS LECTURE WELCOMES HENDRIK HARTOG

The School of Law is delighted to welcome Princeton University's Hendrik ("Dirk") A. Hartog, Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of the History of American Law, as part of our celebrated Addison C. Harris Lecture Series. Hartog, a leading legal historian and former faculty member of the IU School of Law, will give a lecture entitled "Someday All This Will Be Yours: Adoption, Contract, and Duty in Capitalist America," next Monday, April 7, at noon in the Moot Court Room.

Hartog received his JD from New York University in 1973 and his PhD in the history of American civilization from Brandeis University in 1982. Hartog has spent his scholarly life working on the social history of American law and has focused on the difficulties and opportunities that come with studying how broad political and cultural themes have been expressed in ordinary legal conflicts. He has worked in a variety of areas of American legal history, including the history of city life, the history of constitutional rights claims, the history of marriage, and the historiography of legal and constitutional change. Hartog is presently researching inheritance conflicts in 19th- and 20th-century New Jersey and what they reveal about family work relations and caretaking. Before moving to Princeton, Hartog taught at the University of Wisconsin Law School from 1982 to 1992 and at the IU School of Law from 1978 to 1983. At Princeton, Hartog teaches courses in American legal history, family history, and historiography. He is the author and editor of numerous publications in the area of legal history and has been the recipient of a variety of national fellowships and lectureships. His books include Public Property and Private Power: the Corporation of the City of New York in American Law, 1730-1870 and Man and Wife in America: a History.

Established in 1946 by a trust from the bequest of India Crago Harris in the name of her husband, Addison C. Harris, the Harris Lecture Series brings prominent scholars to the Law School every year. Past Harris lecturers have included Owen Fiss, Jules Coleman, Guido Calabresi, Frank Michelman, Barbara Babcock, Lawrence Tribe, Robert Bork, and Derrick Bell. In 1956, the Harris Lecture Series and the Indiana Law Journal formed a partnership that has produced some of the most esteemed and influential articles to appear in the journal, including Robert Bork's often-cited Neutral Principles and Some First Amendment Problems, which was drawn from Bork's Harris Lecture in 1971.

FACULTY AWARD RECIPIENTS

In an informal ceremony last week, our newly minted Dean Robel presented several faculty members with awards in honor of their work in the classroom and in the public interest.

The Leon Wallace Teaching Award was given this year to Professor Kenneth Dau-Schmidt, C.E.O. of the notorious sweatshop Labor Law, Inc. Dau-Schmidt's innovative method of teaching labor law has been highlighted in several national publications. Accepting the award, Dau-Schmidt offered particular thanks to his students, without whose energy and responsiveness, he said, his class would be nothing more than a "strange encounter with a man with an overactive imagination." The Wallace Award has been given annually since 1987 in recognition of outstanding teaching. Susan Wallace, daughter of Leon Wallace, attended the ceremony on Thursday.

The Leonard Fromm Public Interest Award was presented to Professor Amy Applegate, director of the Child Advocacy Clinic. Janet Rumple, of the Public Interest Law Foundation (PILF), commended Applegate's tireless efforts on behalf of both the community and the students she teaches and supervises at the clinic.

In addition, Professors David Fidler and Charles Geyh each received a Trustees Teaching Award. Congratulations to all!

EVENTS & LECTURES

FCLJ SPEAKERS DISCUSS ENTERTAINMENT LAW TODAY

In celebration of its 10th year of publication, the Federal Communications Law Journal is hosting the last, but not least, of its four-part speaker series. Adjunct Professor Robert Meitus (JD'00) and Rick Gevers, a talent agent for broadcast journalists, will discuss entertainment law at noon on Monday, March 31, in the Moot Court Room.

ACS PRESENTS BUSH V. GORE AND VOTING RIGHTS WEDNESDAY

The American Constitution Society (ACS) is pleased to announce its biggest event of the semester! Teresa Wynn Roseborough, counsel for Vice President Gore at the time of his presidential candidacy and partner at the Atlanta firm of Sutherland, Asbill & Brennan, and Marina Hsieh, law professor at the University of Maryland, will present "Bush v. Gore: Looking for a Silver Lining" at noon on Wednesday, April 2, in the Moot Court Room. The program will present the Supreme Court's decision in Bush v. Gore and the Florida cases leading to the disputed election of 2000. Roseborough and Hsieh will focus on voting rights and subsequent election reform activity.

PROFESSOR TANFORD SPEAKS ABOUT INTERDISCIPLINARY EDUCATION THURSDAY

A series of presentations by faculty members about their current research continues this week. Professor Alex Tanford will give a presentation entitled, "Do Law Students Learn Anything? The Use of Interdisciplinary Education in Appellate Litigation" at noon on Thursday, April 3, in the Student Lounge.

VISITING PROFESSOR JANET MCLEAN SPEAKS ABOUT TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS FRIDAY

Janet McLean, the holder of the George P. Smith Distinguished Visiting Professorship-Chair, will give a presentation entitled "Transnational Corporations in History: Lessons for Today" at 3 p.m. on Friday, April 4, in the Moot Court Room. McLean, a member of the faculty of law of the University of Auckland, New Zealand, teaches public and administrative law. Her research includes privatization and corporatization, and contracting as a form of regulation. The professorship is funded by a generous gift from Professor George P. Smith II (JD'64), of the Catholic University of America Law School. Justice Michael Kirby, of the High Court of Australia; Sir David Williams, vice chancellor emeritus of the University of Cambridge; and Tzu-Yi Lin, of Taiwan University are among the previous holders of this professorship.

NEWS FROM THE FACULTY

On Feb. 26, the Supreme Court decided Scheidler v. N.O.W., holding that a civil RICO judgment for N.O.W. against anti-abortion protesters must be reversed because the plaintiffs had failed to establish that the defendants, through their protest activities, had attempted to "obtain property" from the plaintiffs. The court held that property obtainment, as opposed to interference with another's property rights, is an essential element of extortion under the Hobbs Act, which plaintiffs had alleged as the "pattern crime" underlying their RICO suit. The argument that the plaintiffs' suit was flawed for this reason was first made by Professor Craig Bradley in an article published in the Supreme Court Review in 1995. Bradley represented People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) in an amicus curiae brief supporting petitioners.

Professor Fred Cate spoke to congressional staff at the Capital One Legislative Issues Conference in Tampa, Fla., on "The Value of Information Sharing" and at the Freedom Forum First Amendment Center National FOI Day Conference in Washington, D.C., on "The Privacy Problem." Cate's presentation at the Freedom Forum First Amendment Center coincided with the Freedom Forum's publication of his report, "The Privacy Problem: A Broader View of Information Privacy and the Costs and Consequences of Protecting It." The report is available online at http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/PDF/FirstReport.privacyproblem.PDF.

NEWS FROM CAREER SERVICES

HSIEH AND ROSEBOROUGH SPEAK WITH STUDENTS TUESDAY

Teresa Wynn Roseborough, partner at the Atlanta firm of Sutherland, Asbill & Brennan, and Marina Hsieh, law professor at the University of Maryland, will talk with students about their professional experiences at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, April 1, in the Student Lounge. Roseborough and Hsieh are presenting the American Constitution Society's talk on Wednesday about Bush v. Gore and voting rights.

GOVERNMENT PRACTICE PRESENTATION WEDNESDAY

Career Services is hosting a presentation on government practice at noon on Wednesday, April 2, in room 125.

NEW LOG-ON PROCEDURES FOR CAREER SERVICES COMPUTERS

Career Services' new computers require a new log-on procedure. To log on to the new computers, use your university user name and password. Your first log-in will take approximately 90 seconds but will be very brief thereafter. You will be automatically logged out after 10 minutes of idleness so that others can use the machine. If you must leave the workstation, be sure to save your work!

Your CFS (Common File System) account is mapped to drive M, where all work done on Career Services computers must be saved. Files saved to these computers are not accessible from any other place and will be deleted regularly. CFS accounts are network storage provided by the university. They are safe, reliable, and accessible via the Web. Use your CFS account! If you do not have a CFS account, you can create one at http://account.ucs.indiana.edu.

NEWS FROM THE RECORDER'S OFFICE

REGISTRATION FOR FALL COURSES NEXT WEEK

Fall 2003 registration for current 2L and all international students will take place on Monday, April 7. Registration for current 1L students for fall 2003 will take place on Wednesday, April 9.

NEWS FROM STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW SOCIETY DISCUSSES UPCOMING BOARD ELECTIONS TUESDAY

There will be an Environmental Law Society meeting at noon on Tuesday, April 1, in room 120. We will be discussing upcoming board elections. Your attendance is crucial!

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ALUMNI AND DEVELOPMENT TO HOST NEXT STUDENT GROUP LUNCH FOR GRADUATING LLM STUDENTS

As you may know, the Office of Alumni Relations and Development is hosting student groups for lunch every month. BLSA recently met with the alumni and development staff for pizza. A special thanks is extended to BLSA members who joined us for food, conversation, and some laughs. Best of luck to those of you who are graduating! Please stay in touch.

There is no set agenda for the meetings, and as Tim Hightower, director of development, states, "It is simply a time to meet informally and get to know one another. The student group lunches allow students to talk about their experiences, and allow the staff to talk a bit about what we do, how crucial private dollars are, and how these funds enrich the legal education here at IU." The next meeting, for graduating LLM students, will be in early April. If you are a graduating LLM student and would like to attend, alumni and development would love to have you and to hear about your future plans and your time here at the Law School. Please RSVP directly to Tim Hightower (thightow@indiana.edu).

HOUSING INFORMATION

Beginning on Monday, March 31, the housing board on the ground floor across from the SLA Bookstore will be maintained by the Office of Admissions. All information currently posted there will be removed. If you wish to post a housing notice, please submit your information to the Office of Admissions in room 230, or e-mail the details to lawadmis@indiana.edu. All housing notice submissions will be posted on the board as well as on the housing information list that is sent out from the Office of Admissions.

There will be three categories of housing:

Fall information: Listings from area landlords who have units available for the fall

Roommate information: Information about students who are looking for roommates to share housing

Sublet information: Listings of apartments that are available for summer sublet

SCHEDULING EVENTS

ALL e-mail about reserving classrooms must be sent to BL-LAW-EVENTS. Mail must be sent to the correct address, bl-law-events (for Outlook users) or bl-events-law@exchange.indiana.edu (for non- Outlook users). Please include the date and time of event, length of time room will be needed, classroom requested and number of people attending event. Requests should be sent at least one week before the event and include the name of the person requesting, the organization planning the event, and an e-mail address. Confirmations will be sent by reply e-mail. Thank you!

AUDIO - VIDEO SERVICES

Requests for AV services may be sent to Beth at av@exchange.indiana.edu. Please include the name of your group and the e-mail address of the contact person, a description of what you want to do, and the date, location, starting time and duration of the event. Requests must be made at least 48 hours in advance and will be confirmed by e-mail.

CALENDAR

March 31: FCLJ speakers Meitus and Gevers, noon, Moot Court Room

April 1: Environmental Law Society meeting, noon, room 120

Hsieh and Roseborough speak with students, 4 p.m., Student Lounge

April 2: "Bush v. Gore: Looking for a Silver Lining," noon, Moot Court Room

"Government Practice," Career Services, noon, room 125

April 3: Professor Alex Tanford, noon, Student Lounge

April 4: Professor Janet McLean, 3 p.m., Moot Court Room

You can see more upcoming events online at www.law.indiana.edu/calendar/calendarevents.shtml.

ILA: Please visit our Web site at www.law.indiana.edu/publications/ila/ilacurrent.shtml. The ILA is published every Monday with news about the coming week. If you have questions about an item appearing in the ILA, please contact Leora Baude (e-mail lbaude@indiana.edu or phone 855-2426).

Submissions: Information and articles for the ILA should be submitted by Friday at 3 p.m. for inclusion in Monday's edition. Please e-mail all submissions to ila@indiana.edu.